Nike CTR360 & CTR360 II - What's the difference?

To follow up on the release of the new Nike CTR360 Maestri II football boot's we thought it would be a good idea to compare the new boot with its massively successful predecessor, the original Nike CTR360.

The CTR360 boots have built a great reputation during their short time on the market. For Nike, the risk was trying to change something that wasn't broken. The new boots feature subtle amendments and improvements that will hopefully keep the army of CTR fans happy.






Looks-wise, Nike have reverted back to the two-block colour scheme that was used in the first set of CTR's before Nike introduced the gradient colourway CTR boots.





When the CTR was first released, everyone was surprised to see how effectively the boots stood out on television and live at a game. The use of two contrasting colours at either side of the boot was visually very strong for Nike and became a trademark for the CTR football boots.





The shape and size of the dampening pads on the front upper of the boots have changed. On the new CTR II football boots they are larger and feature different shaped grooves which now match the design of the inside control pads.



The control pads on the instep of the new CTR II football boots have also changed. On the new Nike CTR boots, the main pad features a fin-like design reminiscent of the Nike T90 Laser III boots. This injected instep pad offers grip-like traction for more precise ball control.





The memory foam featured on the instep of the original CTRs has now been replaced with another control pad designed to offer further enhanced ball control and feel.



This 'Pass and Receive Pad' is an injected instep pad with grip-like traction that allows precise ball control. The design of this has been inspired from the grip design featured on a Nike golf putter.





Nike have addressed the problem that some people were experiencing with the internal lace loop system on the original CTR boots. Some were finding that the lace loops were breaking away too easily and to combat this, Nike have replaced all internal loops with a traditional lacing system.





So what do you think of the new CTR Maestri II football boot's? Have Nike achieved the tough ask of improving the original CTR boots or will you CTR owners out there be sticking with your originals?